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Abstract Detail


Genomics / Proteomics

Koopman, Margaret M. [1], Hird, Sarah [2], Ence, Daniel [2], Carstens, Bryan [2].

Identifying non-repetitive, nuclear gene rich, highly parallel sequences from non-model plants.

Isolating low copy nuclear genes in plants remains challenging and costly for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. We introduce a genomic reduction method with which to isolate non-repetitive, gene rich, highly parallel sequences from multiple individuals. This approach allows one to explore next-generation high-throughput sequence data from plant groups for which no genomic resources are available. An initial run included 10 individuals of Sarracenia alata (Sarraceniaceae) collected from throughout the range of the species distribution throughout the Gulf Coast. Nearly 30,000 high-quality sequences resulted in the identification of 41 nuclear loci. Preliminary data suggests that 80% of the individual plants have representative sequences for a majority of the loci. Additional data will likely increase locus identification and coverage. Similar data has also been collected to compare the utility of these methods for two unrelated plant groups (Malvaceae and Salicaceae). This approach provides never before seen access to nuclear genes in plants. These data will revolutionize plant phylogeographic studies, and endow researchers with the genetic tools to better investigate relationships among closely related species.

Broader Impacts:


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1 - Eastern Michigan University, Biology, 316 Mark Jefferson Bldg., Ypsilanti, MI, 48197, USA
2 - Louisiana State University, Biological Sciences, 202 Life Sciences Bldg., Baton Rouge, LA, 70803

Keywords:
454 sequencing
Sarraceniaceae
nuclear genes
phylogeography
phylogenetics.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 53
Location: 551B/Convention Center
Date: Wednesday, August 4th, 2010
Time: 10:45 AM
Number: 53003
Abstract ID:567


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