Create your own conference schedule! Click here for full instructions

Abstract Detail


Systematics Section

Freudenstein, John [1], Broe, Michael B. [2], Feldenkris, Emily R. [3].

Resolving relationships at the base of Ericaceae: how do the leafless members fit?

Two groups related to the Ericaceae sensu stricto have long been recognized the pyroloids and monotropoids. The former are small, primarily temperate and boreal subshrubs, occurring in both the Old and New Worlds. The latter are leafless mycoheterotrophs that parasitize fungi, with a center of diversity in western North America, but ranging across the Old and New Worlds in northern regions. The groups have at times been recognized as distinct families, separate from Ericaceae, or have been placed together, but are now clearly a part of that Ericaceae, falling near the base. What is not clear is the relationship of the two groups to each other and to the remainder of the family. Another group in the family, the arbutoids, are also key to this question. They are shrubs with a center of diversity in western North America, but also occurring sporadically more broadly. We employed analysis of nuclear (ITS) and plastid (matK, rps2) sequences, with sampling in each of the key groups and more broadly in the Ericaceae to address their relationships. The pyroloids, monotropoids, and arbutoids were each resolved as strongly supported monophyletic groups. Monotropoids and arbutoids were strongly resolved as sisters, with pyroloids as sister to them, with somewhat less support. This whole monophyletic assemblage is sister to the remainder of the Ericaceae except for Enkianthus, which falls at the very base of the family. The link between monotropoids and arbutoids is consistent with their shared center of diversity in western North America, in contrast to the more boreal and widespread pyroloids. All three of these groups, as well as Enkianthus, represent the majority of Ericaceae that have late anther inversion, a plesiomorphic state in the family. This pattern also suggests two losses of leaves within the family in the monotropoids and in the genus Pyrola (P. aphylla).

Broader Impacts:


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - Ohio State University Herbarium, Dept of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, 1315 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, OH, 43212, USA
2 - Ohio State University Herbarium, Dept. of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology,, 1315 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, OH, 43212, USA
3 - Ohio State University Herbarium, Dept. of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, 1315 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, OH, 43212, USA

Keywords:
Ericaceae
molecular systematics
monotropoids
pyroloids
leafless plants.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 49
Location: 552B/Convention Center
Date: Wednesday, August 4th, 2010
Time: 10:45 AM
Number: 49012
Abstract ID:719


Copyright 2000-2010, Botanical Society of America. All rights